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Help & Guidance - 07 06 2022

What is a Speculative Application?

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What is a speculative application?

A speculative application involves proactively approaching an employer to seek out opportunities, even though the employer may not have advertised any available positions.

What are the benefits of a speculative application?

Within a speculative application, you can really sell yourself to the employer you wish to work for. You also have the added advantage of less competition as the company may not have made the general public aware of any vacancies.

Rather than creating an application around a specification already laid out by the company, a speculative application provides the opportunity to talk about why your individual strengths and skills will benefit the company. If you sell yourself well enough, the company could consider creating a whole new role they never knew they needed to utilise your individual skills and strengths.

What should I include in my speculative application?

  1. An up to date copy of your CV
  2. A cover letter that is industry-relevant and personalised to the company
  3. ALWAYS do your research and address your email or letter to someone specific

Things to remember...

It’s not a numbers game!

Don’t send the same application out to 100’s of different companies as this approach loses the personal touch needed to make this work. Do some research and only send an application across to companies that you know you would really like to work for. Ensure that you show your research throughout the application and explain your passion for the industry or business. The more personal, the better!

 

Any feedback is good feedback

Follow up any applications that you send out and use the feedback you receive to change and adapt your application.

 

Target small, local companies

You are likely to find more success when sending applications to smaller, local businesses. Not only is the decision maker easier to reach but they will have a responsibility in the local community and have more scope for flexibility.

 

Good things come to those who wait

Some companies may not be able to take you on right away due to budget constrictions or other external factors, but if they like your application you may be considered for roles that come up further down the line. You may want to add a section into your application stating that you would like to be considered in the future as you never what progression opportunities might open up.

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